Posts tagged airlines

I can’t get over how gorgeous this new interior that KLM will soon introduce is. Many airlines have used blue tones to sooth and relax passengers, but many create a disconnect with their brand colors. For KLM, it works just perfectly.

I can’t get over how gorgeous this new interior that KLM will soon introduce is. Many airlines have used blue tones to sooth and relax passengers, but many create a disconnect with their brand colors. For KLM, it works just perfectly.

Lufthansa’s Brand New Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental

Mile-high madness with Richard Simmons!

I’ve caught myself a few times disregarding inflight safety videos and then I guilt myself into thinking that if anything should really happen, I would be the one to blame for the demise of the passengers for not knowing what to do.

But you know what? I take that back. If anything should happen, NO ONE would know what to do, because frankly NO ONE ever pays attention.

Inflight safety videos bore everyone to death. They are a requirement by the FAA and must be shown on every flight before take-off. Only a handful of airlines have tried to re-envision what these videos could look like. My knowledge only extends as far as Virgin Atlantic who were the first to create a humorous cartoon video. That was fun to watch. Soon enough, Virgin America made their own lively video.

But today, the trend has extended across the seas to New Zealand where Richard Simmons seem to be big??!! Air New Zealand now holds the number one spot on my list (which I technically haven’t created yet) of top inflight safety videos. Watch and laugh!

You Had Me at “Ice Cream”

Virgin Atlantic Dining

I believe I first flew on Virgin Atlantic when I was 15. I was heading to LA with my uncle back then. All I could remember was how amazing our flight from Heathrow to LAX was. It was 1999 I think, and Virgin had already implemented on-board entertainment. As a kid, it was heaven. How much conversation could I strike with my uncle on a plane anyway?

But the best part of it all was half-way through the flight when a beautiful blond flight attendant gracefully offered me ice cream! HEAVEN! Absolute HEAVEN!

I flew Virgin Atlantic a few times after that when I moved to the US. The service got better until one year when I flew an A340 from JFK to LHR. I can’t remember much of my flight, but I do remember being stuck with a non-functional entertainment system and mediocre food. I was highly disappointed. I lived in denial of that until my parents visited this May for my graduation. They flew Virgin Atlantic to NYC and unfortunately, they were as disappointed as I had been with the food and service. I tried to persuade them that they were just being annoyingly picky, but deep down, I knew there was a 99% chance they might be right.

But never fret, Mom and Dad. Richard has your back! Yesterday, Virgin Atlantic revealed a new upgrade to its economy class dining experience. Believe it, he heard ME and he heard YOU and we didn’t even say much. THAT is what makes a great brand. Listening.

The most successful relationships are those made of great listeners. And that’s why Sir Richard’s Virgin brand has succeeded throughout the years. Not only is he eager to create great experiences for his customers, but he makes sure that Virgin is engaged on a daily basis.

No contest, Virgin Atlantic remains my brand of choice. Honestly, I’m not really picky about airline food, especially that I always try to carry a sandwich and munchies on board with me. That aspect of the flight experience doesn’t make it or break it for me. But when you tempt me with ice cream, well then that equation changes. You have me! :-)

Read more HERE on Virgin Atlantic’s Upgrades to Economy Class Dining Experience /via PSFK

KLM SURPRISE

When I was transiting through Frankfurt this summer, I tweeted from the airport that I was waiting at a Lufthansa gate and that I needed caffeine to wake me up. Almost immediately, a Lufthansa representative tweeted back with a list of coffee spots around my gate and thanked me for flying Lufthansa. 

Somehow this made me smile. Knowing that someone out there is listening makes a big difference. It delights you.

Apparently, KLM tried to move this concept a bit further last year and decided to take advantage of social media to make their passengers a bit happier by surprising them with a gift. A tweet can surely go a long way!

FLYING IS SEXY AGAIN

"Gensler and Virgin America partnered with filmmakers Spirit of Space, the self-described "Architecture Paparazzi," a collaborative that makes films about the built environment, to create this short film that offers a visually rich tour of SFO’s Terminal 2 from the traveler’s perspective: from check-in through take-off."

Air France stays true to its brand with this beautifully choreographed commercial. Simplicity, Elegance and Sophistication. That’s the French culture right there.

British Airways today released it’s new TV spot, created by BBH Labs in London. What’s great is that it gives a “reason why”, while playing off its heritage through a history of flight.

British Airways has never been on my favorites list. And a few months ago after reading Richard Branson’s autobiography, I learned of how much sh*t he had to deal with from BA and its then CEO Lord King while starting up Virgin Atlantic. I became convinced that BA was a devilish brand. I blacklisted it.

But now there seems to be hope…am I getting sucked into the “story”?

Drop the AA. Own America…and Silver.

Brands are powerful. That’s a given. But as a designer I believe they are most powerful when you can recognize them from miles away just by their visual language alone.

Some of the greatest brands of our time have become iconic simply by owning a visual identity. Granted, that’s not enough to make a brand iconic, but it sure helps boost that status. Tiffanys owns the turquoise box. Hermes owns orange. Chanel owns black and white. Virgin owns red…and sassiness. The list goes on…

Last week as I landed back in New York, I was looking out the window admiring the planes at JFK, as I usually do. And I suddenly spotted an American Airlines plane and I began thinking about the potential rebrand that the company is looking at. Now nothing has been confirmed in terms of what will actually happen within the next 5 years, but considering that the company recently purchased 460 new planes to replace their old fleet, and considering that they solisited agencies to pitch for “cabin interiors” earlier this year, I’m banking on REBRAND.

So what would a potential “visual” rebrand of the American fleet look like? It’s hard to say. As much distaste as I have for the customer service of the airline, I still believe that the logo and livery of this brand, designed by the legendary Massimo Vignelli, is probably the best and most recognized livery of all time. 

American Airlines is a brand with a strong heritage. If there were an official national airlines for the United States, it would undoubtedly go to American Airlines. What more than a brand that carries the actual name? Red, White and Blue and an Eagle on top. Could it get more American?

But now consider this. Remove the “AA” logo off the tail. Remove the “American” from the body. You’re left with an iconic glistening silver body and red, white and blue stripes. Would that be heresy? Or would it be an unprecedented approach by a globally iconic airline to stand out from the crowd and claim its right to being “awesome”?

As outrageous as it may seem, many brands have been using this approach recently, and so far it’s been quite elegant and successful. The pioneer behind this was probably NIKE who first removed the word “NIKE” from their logo and stuck with the “swoosh” instead. MTV followed suit by removing the words “Music Television” from their brand. Most recently Levi’s and Starbucks have jumped on the band wagon leaving us with mere symbols of their respective brands.

It takes time for a brand to be able to do something as bold as removing its name off it’s visual identity. It takes years of building customer loyalty and recognition. The companies listed above have all proved to be essential (at least for some) in their daily lives and they’ve gained a global audience that most importantly “trusts” them to do the right thing. 

Will the American public trust American Airlines enough to allow it to pursue such a drastic change in its visual identity? Although theoretical at this point, there’s always a possibility that some crazy CEO might surprise us with the excuse of “innovation”.

No contest Lufthansa has convinced me. It’s a great brand that works hard on consumer relationships. I’m especially taken away by their service on their gorgeous A380s. Nice job Lufthansa!

Designing Virgin America / via SF Gate

This is the brilliance that’s designing Virgin America and making travel sexy again!

My sister and I have been researching airline crew uniforms for a current project I’m working on. We happened to come across the uniforms for Iranair and we were both naturally shocked to see what has happened. The brand reflects an oppressed culture. It’s as simple as that.

My sister and I have been researching airline crew uniforms for a current project I’m working on. We happened to come across the uniforms for Iranair and we were both naturally shocked to see what has happened. The brand reflects an oppressed culture. It’s as simple as that.

A “Brand New” Experience

My Lufthansa experience was quite brilliant, I have to say. My obsessive self examined every little detail of the flight experience from JFK all the way to Beirut. I was very impressed with how granular Lufthansa got with making sure the brand experience was perfect in every form, from the boarding pass, to the gate, to the pillows and blankets and food trays. Their effort in rebranding in the last few years has paid off and given them a well-deserved facelift. One thing that impressed me the most was the self-boarding process. Instead of a gate agent swiping your boarding pass, you did it yourself, similar to how you would swipe a metro card on the subway. I wonder if the boarding process may evolve soon enough to be completely unassisted. It begs the question of whether one day security check could exclude live TSA employees.